What languages do you write in?

My native language is English but I also know German. I often write in German when sending cards to the German-speaking lands. It makes a change for me and hopefully nice for the recipient. I receive quite a few cards written in German.

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Mostly English, Polish to Polish people (or learning Polish - didn’t happen yet), Swedish to some Finnish users (or Swedish - didn’t happen yet)

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I learned French a long time ago so I did write one French one to a French person who said ‘if you speak French please write in French’. I must admit I checked a few things with Google Translate but I was pleased she understood and said I hadn’t forgot my French :joy:

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Most of my postcards I write in English. To Germans or German speakers I write in German to Spanish speakers I write in Spanish and to Dutch Speakers I write in Dutch.

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I usually write in English - even to German postcrossers, though German is my native language… For one, it seems simply natural to “reply” in English when that’s the language of the profile I read. But also, English is simply the best language I know for writing postcards, because it simply takes up less space than German or Polish! Once used to work as an editor for a tri-lingual magazine with texts in all three languages - and the Polish and German versions of the same text always used to be much longer and took a lot of editing out less important information to cut them to the same length as the English texts. So as I like to squeeze a lot of content into my postcards, English is certainly “my weapon of choice” :slight_smile:

But sometimes I also use German - for instance when I get the impression that the adressee’s English may not be too good, or when I write to foreign speakers of German, or when I write about things that for whatever reason I tend to think about in German…

I rarely get a chance to use Polish, but I usually do when writing to Polish postcrossers or foreigners speaking the language.

Sometimes I try to write in French or Portuguese so that native speakers of these languages can have some fun :wink:

And once I wrote in a jumble of English, German and Polish because somebody asked me to write in “my” language, and I couldn’t quite decide which of my languages would be “the most mine” :smiley:

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It depends on the recipients: English, Dutch, Italian, French, Spanish.
I can understand / read German and Portuguese, but I’d write in English to German and Portuguese Postcrossers.

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I mostly write in English. I use German a lot, always check to see if the person speaks German and I recieve quite a lot of German written cards and I love it.
I write card in my super basic Arabic, mostly when it’s a swap, didn’t pick up an Arabic speaker since I’ve started to study:) with Indonesian I always try to use the few words I know:)) and I also use Czech language, to Czech people, Slovakian people and sometimes a little bit to Polish speakers:))) the writing and languages is probably the biggest thing I love about sending cards in general:)))

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I usually write few sentences in every languages,for example,if I write to Italian I will write Piacere di conoscerti(the only sentence I know.I also write a few more sentences if I am writing to a person that speaks German/Dutch/French to help me practice…
But of course I write English for the bulk of the card as it is one of the languages I like and I adore speaking this language instead of Chinese😂

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Polish is a nice language😂I would like to learn Polish one day!But I hear that Polish is difficult,is that a truth??

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The languages I use the most are English (obviously), Russian and German. Although I’m always happy to receive cards written in French or Spanish, it takes a lot of effort for me to write in these languages themselves, so I only do it occasionally - for example when it seems the recipient struggles with English or simply when I feel like it. I would also love to write more in Norwegian, but alas, Norwegian postcrossers are rare. The situation with Icelandic is even worse, but that also applies to my skills. :stuck_out_tongue:

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I write in Spanish so that I don’t forget it. :sweat_smile: WordReference has been my best friend for decades. :raised_hands:

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I write in English or French most commonly, although I extend to any other language on every other occasion; yeah I have been written in German a lot also recently.

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Most cards I write in English or German (to users in Germany mostly). French, Spanish and Finnish if they travel to these countries. I admit, when I get a profile from abroad I often write in English without thinking much about it and after I’m done I notice they might have liked some other language as well and then I feel sorry… so I try to take a closer look at the languages spoken, but often I feel unsure if, for example, a user in the USA who listed Spanish as a language, would like a postcard in Spanish, even if we both know English better - just for the fun of it and some diversion. I really appreciate it if they spend some words on their preferred languages.

I write mostly in English, and German to those who speak / understand it. When sending to a French user I like to write in (very simple) French, usually with the help of a dictionary. I once wrote a card in Italian, as well, but that’s really hard for me so I would only do it on very rare occasions.
I always like it when I receive a card written in one of the languages I list in my profile. I can understand them much better than I could write them. But often, even if I have their native language listed in my profile, people still write in English.

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I am familiar with the English language in secondary school, but often that is not enough.
And for postcrossers from Russia, Belarus, Ukraine and other republics of the former Soviet Union, I write in Russian.

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I write most of my cards in English or in German. In third place comes Finnish for Finnish postcrossers or international postcrossers who want a phrase or two in my native language. I have also written cards in Swedish to Swedish-speaking postcrossers (in Finland & Sweden) and even postcrossers abroad (it amazes how many postcrossers have listed Swedish in their profile :exploding_head:). I can also write a postcard in French, but it takes ages, as my French is a bit rusty. :sweat_smile: For Russian-speaking postcrossers I usually write a bit about myself in Russian (the limit of my Russian knowledge :smile:) and for Chinese-speaking postcrossers “Hello” and “Goodbye” in Chinese. :cn: If I am in the mood I might write “Hello” in the recipient’s language if I know it (e.g. Hola :es: Ola :portugal: Witaj :poland: Ahoj :czech_republic: Konnichiwa :jp:), even if I don’t know their language.

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It is (unless you are from Slavic country, but it works for most languages - similar language group → easier to learn). Be prepared for conjugation, declination and a lot of sz, cz, rz.:wink:

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In most cases, I write in English. Rarely I use Finnish or Swedish. Sometimes, if a profile is entirely in another language that I don’t speak at all, I google translate a message and handwrite it on. So far I’ve done Russian and German and they’ve both been well received.

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I write in my mothertongue German or a bit Dutch if the addressee understands it. But most times I write in English.

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I mostly have 2-3 different languages on the postcards sent to other countries than Belgium (Flanders) or the Netherlands. I always greet the person in Dutch (Dag + name), then I continue in English. Above the address, I write 'thank you, mail carrier ’ in whatever language is the official language of the receiver. Sometimes I write in German, French or Russian (the latter with the help of Google translate) if I think the receiver’s English is not very good or if asked for it.

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