How do you write down very long addresses?

Just curious…
Today I got an address of a Chinese member, as I can write in Chinese, it doesn’t take too many lines, but if write in English, the length of the address can be 7 lines. :sweat_smile:
I am Chinese, but I live in Sweden now. I just memorized when I lived in China, I also have a very long address just like hers.
Normally postcards only have 3-5 lines for people to write the address,so I wonder how do you deal with it?

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I tend to print the address out and tape/glue the address to the postcard. It helps that I can also choose the percent size that I want it if it needs to be smaller to fit the address side of the postcard. I hope that helps.

And I write in a smaller writing between the lines, if necessary.

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Same here.

I find the addresses with really long lines harder to manage - where the address is really wide. I can’t hand write small enough to fit in the line, and when you print them as provided they cross right over into the writing side of the postcard.

Russian and Portuguese addresses seem to be the worst ‘offenders’!

Last one I had, I used my snipping tool to snip out each part of the address and paste into a Word doc, so that I could break one line in half. But that’s not always easy if you can’t understand the language. You might break it in a place that’s not logical to a native speaker.

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You can just mark, copy and past without snipping… that‘s what I do with the Chinese / Taiwanese addresses.

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But that would be an obvious thing to do! Why do that rather than something more complicated…

Honestly, I didn’t think of that because I think that is only possible from the email, and I don’t normally look at those. On the website, you can’t select and copy. I will have to remember that next time.

(And I was so proud of my clever snipping…)

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I just try to write smaller and use more lines if needed.
Even with not especially long ones, I often need more lines as my handwriting is pretty big.
So I might end up with

Street WithaverylongnamewhichIcantfit
house n. 12

and hope for the best :joy:

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For a very long address, I either print it or mark some lines on the card before I write it by hand. The longest I have seen are Indian and Japanese addresses.

I always start writing the address from the bottom upwards. So, first the country, etcetera and finishing with the name. That way, I don’t run out of space to write the country. Depending on the space left, I choose my stamp. I tend to print Chinese addresses if possible.

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I usually print the long addresses especially when there is the 2 versions (native alphabet and latin one).
or write between the lines to give me more space

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Guilty. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:
Especially in my last address where the street had a man’s name, and he had such a big name!!! It’s very usually here to have a Engineer John Bla Bla Bla Bla Smith street, so I can understand your pain. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Back to topic, well, as others had said I just try to write smaller and between the lines and usually give more attention to make numbers perceptible than letters (especially the zip code). Normally I don’t have problems with postcards arriving. :woman_shrugging:

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I bought pens with incredible fine nibs with whose I can write incredibly small. (Take this, Russian address! You are now on the losing side! :rofl:)
For addresses with more than four or five lines I simply add more lines before I start writing.

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I have even worst anticipation ability sometimes and end up with:

Street Withaverylongnamewhichica-
ntfit, house n.12
:joy::joy:

I always worry that I split the addresses in a wrong place so it would be confusing for postal workers. Especially for some Chinese addresses where same word might repeat several times for neighbourhood/region/province (so I try to write/copy the Chinese characters instead)

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