What are your favorite medium(s) to use when creating your mail art/handmade cards?

We have different presses, but maybe you used the well-known Boston Jobbing press? They are quite common for simple printing exercises.

@Speicher3 Yeah, the classroom had one of those. I had fun with them, well, when I wasn’t modifying some negatives in the darkroom for classmates. I liked working in the darkroom the most back then. I haven’t worked with presses or in a darkroom since graduating from high school, sadly.

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Oh, you even learned how to work with negatives in a darkroom? That’s great! :+1:

I love to knit cards. I love knitting different patterns and so I can try a new pattern on a smaller scale.

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I’ve sort of wanted to try that since seeing a picture of a knitted card, but I’m curious about the logistics. Do you sew yours to a paper/cardboard backing for the message? And then send in an envelope?

I punch holes around the edges of a cardboard and then sew the knitted piece onto the cardboard. You can easily send those cards without envelope :slight_smile: But as they are heavier than normal cards, I use the postage for letters, not for cards.
Here you can see a card that I sent my parents during the lockdown :laughing: :mask:

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I haven’t made a knitted postcard for some time now but I’m sure to take it up again if we manage to open a tag for it! :smiley:

This was my very first knitted postcard, definitely not as nice as @taebbig’s, this was just a test, my other knitted cards were neater but I don’t have photos of them :laughing:
I also sewed them on cardboard. This particular card was sent without envelope and to Russia if memory serves me right, made the journey without incident but it did take a long time to arrive…

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@taebbig @Feuerstuhl

I need to share this with my mother-in-law. She is a knitter and a weaver, and I think she’ll get a kick out of these cards. I wonder if she’ll start mailing me more cards after seeing this.

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I love using 20 different colors of sharpies, stickers, washi tape and writing my messages in different styles from most other people- peace from DJ

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Mostly paper and cardstock, but I did some with fabric too. Oh… and colourful pens (for handlettering).

I admired your beautiful knitted cards several times in the past. Maybe we can swap sometime (maybe for a sewn card in return?)

Here’s a card I’ve sewn for @Reisegern. But I’m still very slow doing this, I need to remember all the steps (else the fabric won’t look nice :smiley: )

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@Cassiopheia That sewn card looks amazing!

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Knitted and fabric postcards, wow! How nice! :heart_eyes: I have to try this someday.

I wish I had time to create more. I like to use printed cardstocks, my envelope punch board, precision press, stickers, brushpens, heat embossing, glossy accent.
I got a Silhouette Portrait 2 weeks ago now and learn how to use it. I bought it first to do my own sticker and die cuts, and to use it for school too to make task cards for my pupils.

Oh wow, I’m loving these knitted and fabric cards! And they really travel okay?

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I’ve not send that many (only 3 so far), but they all arrived in pefect condition. And I received some sewn cards and they were fine, too!

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Yes, they do. I received one knitted and one crocheted card, and they both arrived just fine.

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I recently bought some watercolor pens and have started painting cards.

For those of you who paint or draw, how do you seal them? The watercolor definitely needs something to protect it.

When I use water-based inks and I am afraid of bleeding, I use one of the following:

Tim Holz distress glaze. This is a wax that you rub into the finished project. It leaves a very slight sheen, and has to be done at the end because you cannot work over it. I don’t think it would protect against severe water damage but it is good enough for when something is a little wet from rain. I also use this over paper if I am afraid the paper will dissolve or the printing may run if it gets wet. Be sure your project is completely dry before you use it, because otherwise the rubbing may smear the ink. (I would love to find a similar “no name” wax glaze because to be honest I think most “Tim Holz” products are ridiculously expensive, so if anyone knows of one, please speak up!! :slightly_smiling_face:)

Clear spray lacquer I use spray lacquer with good results. I have matte, satin, and shiny finish and am happy with them.

Book covering adhesive plastic. If it is a smooth card and I want a “finished” looking front I will cover it with a library-quality book covering adhesive plastic. This is like the panzer glass of card protection and I love the finished look, but it only works if the paper is smooth and there is no dimension to the art (and if you want a shiny surface)

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How do you keep the paper flat when painting on it or even using glue. Mine always ends up wanting to curl up on itself.

I put 2 cards together in one laminating pouch, the picture sides look outside. After laminating I cut off the edges and so the 2 cards separate from each other. So the picture is safe and I can write normally on the card.
I hope you can understand what I mean :see_no_evil:

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I didn’t think that the laminating material would stick to a card after cut apart, only to other laminating material. That’s a great idea!