- ‼ updated rules - Need help translating a postcard you've received?

This is a topic where you can request help from other postcrossers to translate something you cannot read on a postcard you have received.

You can post a photo of your postcard text here, and someone will hopefully see your request and reply with a translation soon. Please make sure you hide any identifying details from the image, such as names or Postcard IDs.

Keep in mind that you can use tools like Google Translate, DeepL, Yandex Translate for a quicker result.

Note: The purpose of this topic is to help translate text that is unintelligible, and posts on the topic are regularly deleted, so that postcard messages don’t stay here for too long. The Community Guidelines still apply otherwise, both in other part of the forum as well as outside of it, so please don’t share the written side of postcards elsewhere.

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@littlesthobo @Adonis_sibirica

I think it says ‘pretty’ (village).

PS Pont-en-Royans was chosen in 2021 as the most beautiful village in the Isère department (southeastern France) and La Poste released this stamp for the occasion:

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This is a bit more complex as it wouldn’t make sense to simply translate it without context. The card is in low German and about a well known person from Hamburg. His name was Johann Wilhelm Bentz, a water carrier from Hamburg who was called Hans Hummel.

Children mocked him, calling Hummel Hummel and he replied with Mors Mors (Mors is the low German word for butt, closest translation would be "kiss my a…). This quite unusual “call” is still used in Hamburg e.g. in sports, some songs, sometimes even to greet. But a person from Hamburg might explain it a lot better :rofl:

Now to the lower part of the text, a (very) loose translation, but I can’t think of a better one right now:

Hummel Hummel! shouts the kid. He turns around and you bend your finger to the hole at the back.

edit: after thinking about it, I want to add a bit more explanation to the lower part as well… as explained above Mors is low German for butt and the meaning behind mors, mors is Klei di an’n Mors (litterally “scratch your butt”, but meaning “kiss my a…”). But with this context the hole in the card should make more sense.

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This is really interesting, as the greeting is written in Sütterlin script but than switched to normal Latin letters :grin: But the sender didn’t like to use any punctuation marks, I will add them for easier reading!

Liebe Kinder,
Guten Morgen.
haben Kaffee getrunken, jetzt geht es weiter. Das Wetter ist fein. Wünschen euch alles Gute.
Love Opa + Oma
Auf Wiedersehen

Dear Children,
Good Morning. We had some coffee and now we move on. The weather is fine.
Wishing you all the best,
Love Grandpa + Grandma
Goodbye

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This is what google lens says:

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@pcronn I can’t help with translating the Russian, but I do recognize the symbol as one of the tattoos found on the Siberian Ice Maiden!

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When you have a girl-/boyfriend in Germany we say „I‘m going with XY.“ That means XY is my partner.

On this card there is the question: „do you wanna go with me?“ And you have three possibilities to answer: yes, no or I‘m here with my bike.

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Can someone translate this card for me? Google Lens isn’t that helpful.
Many thanks!:sun_with_face:

Google Lens is not perfect. That’s why we have this thread!
I like it when people add information or explain the cultural background, play-with-words, nuance and meaning behind the message .

ちっぽけな自分を空の上から眺めてみよう。

ほら、
今のその悩みなんて
ちいさい。
ちいさい。

Here is the literal translation:
Try to look at your little self from the sky.
See? The worries you have now
are tiny. tiny.

What it means: (this is a “cheer-up” postcard)
When we’re down, let’s try to look at ourselves from far far above.
See? Looking at things from a much bigger scale, even the troubles and worries we’re experiencing right now become tiny. Very tiny.

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This is a beautiful message, thank you so much!:smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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Hello Timur, greetings from Germany. I like to read, especially books from M. Atwood. All the best and peace to the world, Angela.

@Slerk make sure you check the new rules for the thread — you need to hide/blur/cover any identifying information like the postcard ID.

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Thanks for the help. I have already deleted the message, I will henceforth cover it up.

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쓰담 쓰담 means lightly patting
반갑습니다 is a very polite way of saying “nice to meet you”
5월의 마지막 일요일이요 literally means it is the last Sunday of May, equal to the sender wrote this card on 29/5, the last Sunday of May.

And sorry for not typing out the remaining Korean characters (I am lazy…)

The sender said he/she was looking forward to the EUROPA stamps (유로파 우표) too, and they are hard to receive. He/she also wish you great days in a very polite way.

2022년 5월 29일

  • 년 means year, 월 means month, 일 means day

ps. the sender is not using the typical style of writing, seems like some local dialects’ style is mixed in, I guess he/she is not from Seoul?

Hope this helps ◡̈

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*Thank you so much! That’s lovely! :relaxed: I’m still a bit confused though why the sender would think that I would understand Korean, when clearly she/he understands and could have written in English (first I thought maybe they don‘t know English) But I guess we‘ll never know…:woman_shrugging:

Many people auto translate pages and seem oblivious to the fact that they do. It seems they therefore think people speak their language, because they can read their profile in that language.

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Translate please :rose:



Hi Kristina and Monika! This is a reply card for you! Thank you for the sending bears! I love reading. My favorites are the tales from Brother Grimm. Love + peace, Andrea

Hello Kristina, I send you many greetings from Germany. I live in Saxony in a small town. But on holidays often we are on the Baltic Sea. All the best" Christ…

Hello Kristina,
many greetings from Germany. The place you can see on this card is located 25 km from my home. Best wishes Arno

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Thank you :heart:

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Received this postcard from Belarus. Can anyone help me with a translation? Thank you!

Hello! My name is Egor.
I like to walk with my friends and ride a bike.
I have a red cat Simba!
All the best!

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