Unexpected swap received

Today I received a letter from a man in Brazil, asking me for swaps of postcards and stamps. I’ve no idea how he got my address. I’ve only ever had 2 postcards from Brazil, and I’m fairly sure he wasn’t either of those senders.

He didn’t mention Postcrossing at all, but just said ‘I saw your address on a FB’s’ Does he mean Facebook? I’ve never shared my address there of course!

I’m just a little worried in case some postcrosser has been putting other people’s addresses on Facebook. I don’t suppose there’s much we can do if they have.

Has anyone else experienced anything like this?

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That’s very odd & yes, a little worrying.

It sounds like he perhaps got your address off a Facebook group site which is NOT supposed to happen - addresses are to be kept private & not shared - Postcrossing takes this rule very seriously.

But sadly I have occasionally seen other people offer up PC addresses to others on Postcrossing FB groups even when they’re told it’s against the rules. One person thought it would be “fun” for the receiver to get cards from other parts of the country. :frowning_face:

You might want to contact Admin here Contact us & let them know including the ID of the 2 cards you’ve received from Brazil previously. You could also include the letter sender’s contact info & they might be able to check if they are a PC member. I assume you haven’t done any swaps with folks from Brazil in the Forum?

I wouldn’t respond to the request. There aren’t huge numbers of PC members in Brazil so hopefully you won’t get any more requests like this.

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A FB can mean a Friendship Book; a tiny homemade booklet where people include their address, and sometimes preferences related to swapping. They’re typically sent from person to person until its full and is sent back to the owner/creator.

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Many thanks for this helpful reply. I will contact Admin as you suggest.

best wishes
Shelley

Many thanks, I don’t know this. It sounds more logical that it would mean Friendship book actually.

I would ask the person where exactly did he get it, Friendship book or Facebook, and how was it there. (If you want to have it removed.)

As far as I know, in friendship book, you write your own address. So you would know if your address was there.

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I do know some Postcrossers will put their return address not for a return pc or reply but if the pc isn’t deliverable or addressee has moved and never updated address.

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I guess asking the sender for an explanation is out, unless you actually want to swap, because if I understand correctly you don’t know whether he’s a Postcrosser or have any way of contacting him online. If you send a letter declining to swap but asking who shared your address, the chances he would respond are next to zero. . .

Did you by any chance penpal as a child, including briefly through a school project? Could it be that you wrote your address in a FB a looooong time ago? :thinking: And are you still living at the same address?

I used to fill out FB’s sent to me by penpals as a child, because it seemed like the polite thing to do and a way to potentially meet new penpals (this was before the internet) and they were only being sent around between children, friends of friends in a sense, and it was a more innocent time. Funny story: Everyone put their ages, but the booklets weren’t dated. One of them must have somehow gone back into circulation after a long break, because I received a few responses years later from children who thought I was their age! :joy:

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When I read this, my first thought was Friendship Books too. They were fairly common in the late 90’s and 2000’s. I used to swap a lot of FB’s with my penpals. But the usual courtesy was that everyone wrote their own address, and not someone else’s address. Could you perhaps have written your address in one and forgotten about it because it was many years ago?