Thin postcards, to send or not to send?

Hi Postcrossers,

I have some postcards that are thinner than the more common card stock. I’m curious if people have sent thin postcards before or if you would advise against it?

Any advice welcome!

1 Like

It would be a waste if you already have but don’t use them. So send them away :wink:

Some postcards are thin, many Japanese postcards I received are thinner than postcards from Europe for example. Both kind of cards survived :blush:

If you’re not sure, you can always send it in an envelope
Some postcrossers may like them to be sent in envelope, but I guess fast majority don’t mind “travel scar” of the card

There’s even famous series of card : World Travel, that is quite thinner than other series, I have received these from far away land : Iceland and Faroe Islands and they arrived safely

7 Likes

Thin cards might have lower survived-the-postal-system rate if sent without envelope, but otherwise I don’t see a reason to not send. I have sent some thin cards myself and I have this one very unfortunate book that calls itself a postcard book but the postcards are as thin as normal printer paper. I have decided to not send those as postcrossing cards because they look like a cheap prints, but I use them for other penpaling activities. But those are really like paper like you can roll them up without causing any damage.

2 Likes

I put myself this question with some cards too and so far didn’T send them.
I would say it depends on many factors - for example how thin they are. Second: Would you yourself enjoy receiving such cards? (That’s always a very good decision maker.)
And then it’s of course a question of your budget - so if you don’t have so much money to send other cards, as long as they are not paper, but cards, they qualify as postcards. But if you happen to be a rather rich person then I would consider to not use them.
And maybe to only use them, if they match someones wishes (or better than any other card in your stock).
If you ask yourself if they are good enough that’s already a hint, isn’t?
So these are some of my thoughts on it.
But after all, everyone is different, and needs to make his/her own experiences.
Maybe one last point: How do you FEEL sending them? If there is some ugly emotion like shame or fear or a slight peng of guilt or so, than I would not send them (because it would not do yourself good).
But if you draw an adress and honestly believe such a card is good for the recipient and you as sender, than why not?
(and if you ask myself personally: yes, I would mind receiving some paper instead of a card. But I already received a beautiful card the sender considered to be too thin … (but the picture & writing was sooooo beautiful, it didn’t matter)
Really a not easy to answer question!

Have fun with postcrossing - make people happy & and enjoy!

3 Likes

The few damaged cards I have received were regular thickness. The thin ones I’ve sent globally were received in good condition.

4 Likes

I have received many thin postcards (mostly from Asia) and often they have arrived in pretty poor condition. I personally don’t recommend sending them.

1 Like

I have received some paper thin, that when you try to keep them horizontal, they “drop”.
I would not send thin like that.
But I have received thin one, that still somehow was sturdy (?), (very easy to put to a plastic pocket).

I too have a rule, sending one I’d like to have. But, when I think the theme is good, and they like for example cats, and my only cat card would be thin, I would send it. But not papery. Sometimes in history it’s been possible to mail a slip from a magazine, but I think that times mail was handled by real persons.

If it’s still clearly a card rather than a paper, maybe make it sturdier by using many stamps, washi etc.?

1 Like

Hi there! I have received some thin cards (and some great handmade ones using just construction paper). They’ve mostly arrived fine and for the few that have a bit of wear, I just consider it part of their story, a sign of the journey they took if you will. So I guess my suggestion is, if they fit someone’s profile, I’d send them.

2 Likes

One of the reasons I avoid box sets is concerns about card thickness. I have Sibley’s birds but don’t send much due to thin paper, but they can go in an envelope.

1 Like

As long as they’re slightly thicker than ordinary paper, I wouldn’t be at all concerned about how they hold up through the mail. For example, even a piece cut from kids’ construction paper usually travels just fine without an envelope.

Whether Postcrossers will like them or not, though, is a separate question. To me it is all about the message, not collecting a certain quality of card, but that’s just me.

If you don’t consider them good enough for official Postcrossing, you could always swap them here on the forum (where you can disclose the quality ahead of time) or send them to real life friends and family.

1 Like

I have a lovely young lady in Africa I exchange with. Her csrds are thin but its what she has available to her & I wouldn’t offend. We just have to consider choices maybe more limited in some locations

3 Likes

I got some thin cards that were so beautiful so yes, send them! :slightly_smiling_face:

2 Likes

I’m too scared to send thin postcards “naked”, especially since mine a retro postcards. I only send them without envelope if the distance is short (Russia, Poland, etc.) or i’m sure the postal offices are gentle with the mail (USA sorting machines are true evil)

1 Like

I bought a box from amazon with beautiful prints! But the cards are also very thin! I’ll most likely send them out because I love how they look but I’m worried,too.

1 Like

I’ve sent a very thin German card to Germany. It arrived perfectly.

2 Likes

Yesterday I received a very thin card or torn piece from maybe small notecard, crumpled.
It was sent in May or June, from Germany, but of course I can’t know if it travelled this long because of it’s thinness or some other reason. (edit, or if it was sent then :slight_smile: )

Writing this, because often we only know about the thin cards that arrived, but not how many are lost :frowning:
(but for example this what I now got, I would call paper, not thin card)

1 Like

What I can get in Japan - lots of them are quite thin, so I always ask the recipients in tags and swaps if they want it stamped and written or in an envelope.

1 Like