Number 7: To cross or not to cross?

I wondered about this years ago when I was in school. I find myself using both styles but not consciously in my day to day writing but if I am writing an address I try to be very precise. Again, Postcrossing teaches us something about the world and cultures. Winner!

I cross my 7s and I live in Australia, but I’d say maybe only a minority of people here do.

It will never confuse an Australian postcard recipient though — it’s common enough to be an unsurprising feature of someone’s handwriting.

Really? I learned to write the 7 crossed in school and so did my children 30 years later… :thinking:

:green_heart: :fox_face:

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i think you mean this topic.

also. i cross my 7 but cards from people that don’t cross their 7 arrive all perfectly, so i wouldn’t worry too much about that.

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You’re right. Some schools teach it with, some without :sweat_smile:

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Hello, in French school we learn to cross the 7 :blush:

I learnt it that way (80s) :thinking:, my son, too (2014).

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Until recently I did not know there are two ways of writing 7 !!!

:slight_smile:

For me it has always been only

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When I started to get letters from abroad I was surprised how people in other countries write this number

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For what it’s worth: In the Netherlands, it’s crossed.

Thank you, @clubpostcards! My greatest worry was for the Eastern countries. I will write my 7’s going to Japan, China, etc. like you show in your example. :smiley_cat:

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@Tinkatutu, you’re right about the 1’s. I’ve noticed that many European Postcrossers write their 1’s almost like a teepee. I should start adding the “half hat” (I like that term) to my 1’s as well. Thanks.

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@Tetsuko, yes, this is actually my concern. People can figure it out, yes, but machines that read the numbers might misread. I’m afraid a European machine might read a 7 as a 1, and now I’m thinking they might read a 1 as an I as well.

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Thanks for all of the input, everyone! It’s all been very helpful!

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Hopefully I can reassure you that at least Austrian machines do not misread the 7 and the 1. I have already received many cards from the USA. :slight_smile:

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At least the last wouldn’t be a problem for German addresses. Our PLZ (Postleitzahl) - the part of the address which directs to a region/part of city - only contains numbers, no intermixing of 1 and I.
Well okay the house number can contain an added letter like a, b,… And I’ve seen houses with an i or j, too, for example “Bernhardstr. 13i”, but on this level the mail carrier can handle it.

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Yes! My postcode has a 7 in it and when the 7 is written uncrossed, German Post always!!! put a BIG sticker on the written address (and sometimes on some parts of the message) with the message that they had to search for the right address …

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I never cross the 7 but I do make sure it is written clearly so it can’t be mistaken for a 1.

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I didn’t know it was common here…I never heard of this until I started Postcrossing. I still write it the normal way, as I see it on my phone or computer: 7

I used to write 7 but when I encounter elderly people or people with eye sight issue, I started to crossed the number seven. Here in Malaysia, we write 7 and crossed seven. Both are good to use.

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